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Rachael
The Sparrow - Mary Doria Russell

Apparently very highly regarded, but disappointing. Thought-provoking, but a lot of the thoughts it provoked were about what was wrong with it.

It was very slow-paced. It was told in two timelines: the discovery of an alien race and the planning and execution of the first-contact mission, in the 2010s, and the aftermath and discussion of what went wrong, in 2060. I think the book could have begun about halfway through, and been half as long. By halfway through the book, the mission hadn't launched yet in the 2010s timeline, and the guys in 2060 had hardly got anywhere in their investigation. The 2010s timeline was kind of worth reading anyway, because the characters were quite entertaining even when just sitting around having dinner parties; but the 2060 characters weren't.

The book was set in the late 2010s, i.e. now, but they had an active asteroid-mining industry, some kind of human settlement on Mars, and wood was so rare that it was illegal to burn it or build with it. I'm used to that sort of thing in sci-fi written in the 1950s, but this was published in 1997.

My first major complaint is that the aliens really weren't alien enough. They are bipeds, with two tool-using hands, eyes, and mouths. They have two sexes, and not only reproduce sexually (like, say, Earth plants do), but also have sexual arousal and non-procreative sex. They sleep, and they eat food made from plants and animals. Children are born and raised in families. The aliens communicate by speaking with their mouths, and their language fits recognisable Earth grammatical categories and yields to standard linguistic fieldwork techniques. (It's not that the step of learning each other's languages is skimmed over or just assumed to have happened. It is narrated in great detail, and seems realistic - just not alien enough.) The story could have worked, with relatively few changes, if it were about an undiscovered Polynesian tribe rather than beings from Alpha Centauri. There were a couple of moderately interesting cultural oddities - third-born children are marginalised and not permitted to have children of their own; the aliens don't use first-person pronouns but refer to themselves obliquely as "someone" - but nothing you wouldn't find in a human culture.

I've read some essays by Asimov where he rants about some of the sci-fi of his childhood in the 1930s which was just "westerns in space" - stories with the superficial trappings of sci-fi but which were fundamentally not sci-fi. I feel the same way about this book.

My second major complaint: Suppose you went to an alien planet and found a man - the sole survivor of the first-contact mission some years ago, and the only human on a planet of aliens - working in an alien brothel. (Yes, they have brothels, and yes, it is anatomically possible for a human to work in one. See "not alien enough".) Would you assume he was working there by choice for his own enjoyment, or that he was enslaved there? I would assume enslaved. But the crew of the second mission - and all the media on Earth when they get back, and basically every person on Earth - assume he's there because he's a debauched libertine, and they all condemn him for it. That just seems implausible to me. (Also, he's both heterosexual and vowed to celibacy. Even if he were both gay and known for shagging anything that moved, I'd still hesitate before thinking he was there by choice, but at least then it would be an explanation to even consider.) Then, a couple of pages from the end, in 2060, he reveals that he was enslaved and raped. Is it supposed to be a twist? Am I spoiling it by mentioning it here? Or is it supposed to be obvious to the reader but not to the characters for some reason? I'm not sure.

There is a lot of theology in this book. Most of the characters are Jesuits (along with a Jew and a couple of atheists). The Jesuits launch the mission, not specifically to preach to the aliens (I don't think they ever mention God to them), but "for the greater glory of God". The characters' religion is nuanced and questioning and not at all glib, which is a point in the book's favour. There were a lot of theological references, which as a Christian I found interesting, but someone uninterested in Christianity probably wouldn't.

The book deals with weighty theological questions, like "why does God allow suffering?" and "why does God seem to call people to a task and then allow it to go horribly wrong?" They are important questions, but I'm not sure this book adds anything to the last few thousand years of thought about them.

The Plot to Save Socrates - Paul Levinson

I'm afraid I gave up on this quite early on. (Although if anyone's read it and reckons it gets better, please let me know.)

It's a time travel story, which is usually a plus. But I really didn't like the way it was written. There was a lot of "As you know, Bob"-type expository dialogue. And the main character, although she's a grad student (why are time travel protagonists so often grad students? Making History, The Accidental Time Machine...), doesn't seem to be very intelligent, and needs her boyfriend to explain some of the basic implications of time travel to her.

I wonder if this was written by someone who had read a lot about Socrates but not much about time travel, and thought the time travel stuff would need spelling out to his readers? Or maybe he's just a bad writer.

Brilliance - Marcus Sakey

This was excellent - a breath of fresh air after a string of mediocre books.

It's set in the present, in an alternate reality in which, starting from 1980, a minority of kids were born with super-genius abilities and no one really knows why. Now the first generation are grown up and having dramatic effects on the status quo, and there is a lot of tension between them and normals. The normals are frightened, and introducing increasingly oppressive control measures, and the brilliants are worried and resentful, and some are turning to terrorism.
It's intelligently written and doesn't patronise the reader. There was a mini-twist about four pages in which I found pleasing.
There's an anti-hero, a lot of black-and-grey morality, high stakes, shifting loyalties and uneasy alliances, entertaining character interactions, Xanatos gambits, and edge-of-seat tension in the finale. Strongly recommended.

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The Ice Twins - S K Tremayne
This is about a couple who had 7-year-old twins and one died, and the family move to a remote spooky location, and the surviving twin starts claiming she's actually the other one.
It reminded me a bit of the Point Horror book Twins, which I read as a teenager. In that one, a teenage pair of twins switch identities for a day, for fun, but one of them (the more outgoing and popular one) dies during that day, and her shyer sister misses the first opportunity to come clean and then feels it's too late, so is stuck pretending to be her sister. Of course, The Ice Twins being an adult book, it's told from the POV of the parents rather than the twins.
The other thing it reminded me of was The Little Stranger by Sarah Waters. I was never quite sure whether that was a ghost story or a psychological thriller, and I think that was deliberate on the author's part. This is similar: the setting is remote and creepy, and the mother has some psychological issues, and you're never quite sure what's real and what's her imagination (and, of course, neither is she). It's quite chilling, especially at the end.

The Things we Wish Were True - Marybeth Mayhew Whalen
This is good summer reading. Most of the plot takes place at a communal outdoor swimming pool over the course of one summer in North Carolina. Practically every page mentions the heat or sunscreen or similar.
It's about a group of people in the same neighbourhood and how their lives and pasts intersect. There are a lot of novels like that, and I often find them boring, and I can't quite put into words why I liked this one so much. It's uplifting, I'll say that much.

The Girl Before - J P Delaney
This is quite strange. It's about a house designed by, and belonging to, an eccentric and intense architect. He rents it out below market rate on condition that the tenants obey an exacting list of lifestyle restrictions.
The book tells, in parallel, the story of the current tenants, and the story of the girl who lived there before them and died in mysterious circumstances. The stories are quite similar and convergent, to the extent of being confusingly so in places. But overall it was an enjoyable thriller.

Guilty Innocence - Maggie James
I assume this was inspired by the Jamie Bulger case. A woman discovers that the man she's been dating was one of two boys convicted of killing a toddler when they were 11, having served his sentence and been given a new identity. The story is told from her POV and his, and deals with her struggle to reconcile the information with the loving man she knows, and her anger that he has this secret; and his feelings of guilt and of anxiety about whether they can have a future together.

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Little Boy Found - L K Fox
This starts with a man seeing his son being kidnapped, but it's revealed soon afterwards that the son has been gone for a year and the father is reliving the flashback. There's an interspersed story about a teenage girl with a dangerously obsessive crush on a local minor rock singer, and it's not at all obvious how these stories are related. The answer is extremely satisfying and twisty.

Before He Finds Her - Michael Kardos
This starts with a good hook: a blog post by an elderly, dying reporter who has been fascinated by an unsolved local murder for many years, and is disappointed that he might soon die without ever knowing the answer. His blogging style shows him to be a very likeable and engaging character. The case involved a man who killed his wife and disappeared with his 3-year-old daughter; the man and daughter were never found, and may or may not still be alive.
Then the narrative switches to Melanie, a teenage girl growing up with her very restrictive aunt and uncle, several years later. She simultaneously resents their overprotectiveness and understands the reasons for it, as they are trying to protect her from her father, who killed her mother and wants to find and kill her. It's obvious that she's the missing girl, and I don't think this is intended to be a secret from the reader.
But as she gets older she increasingly chafes against the restraints and wants a normal life, where she can go out with friends and appear in photos and have a social media presence; and she wants to find out the whole truth about what happened when she was three, and whether her father is really still out there. She runs away from home, and meets up with Arthur, the elderly reporter from the prologue. The relationship between them is entertaining, as she's young and naive, and he's a bit crusty and curmudgeonly, and she pretends to be older than she is and a reporter, and he sees right through her. Once he figures out who she is, he's very willing to help her, and they team up to solve the mystery, which is pleasingly convoluted.

He Said She Said - Erin Kelly
I bought this because it was by Erin Kelly, who is excellent. But it actually took a while to get going and become interesting, and I might not have persisted with it if I didn't already know and like the author. There's too much about Laura and Kit's present-day relationship - which is basically stable and loving, with some tension - before we get to the interesting thing that happened in their past. Before that, there are too many annoying half-hints and vague references to some past event and some present danger, but there are too many isolated pieces and they are too vague, so the effect was not to intrigue me and draw me in and make me want answers, but to make me think "meh, I can't even keep track of what the questions are."

(I wasn't sure whether to put the following paragraph in a spoiler cut or not. On one hand, it's information which the author has chosen to keep from the reader until about a third of the way through. On the other hand, I think the first third of the book would be more interesting and comprehensible with it.)
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Spoilers for both of the last two books
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Silent Age is a great point-and-click adventure about time travel (not to be confused with Broken Age, which I didn't think much of).

It looks quite low-budget, and the dev team in the credits is small, with one person doing most of the design, writing and programming. It's partially voice-acted, which is unusual: conversations between the protagonist and other characters are voiced, but his reactions to player commands are just text. I suppose this is logical, because they're his thoughts rather than speech, but I haven't seen it before; I've only seen games which are fully voiced or not at all.

The plot is great, and, like many time-travel plots, fuelled late-night discussion.

The dialogue is OK, nothing special.

The puzzles are fun and entertaining. They are simpler than some, but surprisingly challenging given the nature of the game, which is very linear, with relatively small locations. The character discards most inventory items as soon as they've been used (even really useful-looking ones like knives and top-level security access cards), which means your inventory only ever has two or three things in it. Each new location is a new chapter in the game, and there's no going back to previous locations, so each chapter is almost like a locked-room puzzle: you know the solution has to be nearby. As a result, they haven't bothered to implement savegames: instead, once you've reached and unlocked a chapter, you may start from that chapter on a future occasion, and because the game is so linear, there's nothing you could have done in previous chapters to change the way later chapters play out.

The developers have thought about many of the incorrect things you might try, and given them custom responses, rather than a generic "That won't work", which is pleasing.

The puzzles really make use of time travel - like Day of the Tentacle, but in a different way. In DOTT you have three characters in three different time periods, who can send each other items, or strategically use items in one time period to affect a later time period. In Silent Age there's one character who can jump back and forth between the 1970s and the 2010s, so there's a bit of that as well, doing something in the past to have an effect in the future, but there's also a lot of actual time travelling, as opposed to remaining in one time for most of the game. He uses time travel as a way to escape danger, and he also uses the time dimension very much like an extra spatial dimension, allowing him to "go around" obstacles. If a door is locked in 1972, it might not be in 2012, so you jump forward, walk through the open door, and jump back.

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  • "it takes time to process the raw materials" - wants to insert an article before "time". Grammarly is generally rubbish at coping with article-less nouns, but this case is especially bad because "it takes time" is a common phrase.

  • "we are going against the direction of the arrow" - wants against->in, completely reversing the intended meaning.

  • its absorption spectrum has peaks - wants "has peaked".

  • A non-work example: "That's such a great idea to use cotton bud painting to practise holding a pen." wants "practice". A lot of its mistakes are egregious and funny, but that one is just bound to mislead its target market of people who aren't confident about difficult usage questions like practice/practise.

  • "A fixed asset is something a firm plans to keep for longer than one year" - wants "a firm plan". Not because it wants to treat a firm as a plural entity, but because it thinks we're talking about a plan which is firm. The expandable explanation box makes that clear.

  • "[The company] asked its employees to use the new shampoo, then complete a survey about it." -> wants "completed" (you need fairly subtle human semantic understanding to realise that the company didn't complete a survey, it asked the employees to complete one)

  • "Which Business Management tools did it use to come up with the number of 500,000 cars?" -> "Which did Business Management tools...?" Huh?

  • "Staff may be made redundant and spare land and capital can be reallocated or sold." -> wants comma after "land": staff may be made redundant and staff may spare some land?

  • "The heat given out was sufficient to turn the sand around the burning wells into glass." - wants "a glass". In the last instalment, scientific processes were spontaneously creating lamps (a blue light), and now they're creating tableware (a glass).

  • "If the temperature of a substance increases" - wants "substance increases" or "a substance increase". No idea why.

  • "This agreement, and its follow-up, can be regarded as the most successful example of international cooperation concerning an environmental problem seen to date." Wants to remove comma after "follow-up", and change "seen" to "is seen", making a complete mess.

  • "it speeds up the forward and reverse reactions equally." - wants "reverses" - I guess it speeds up "the forward", whatever that is, and also it reverses reactions equally.

  • "an ionic solid dissolves" - wants "dissolve" - thinks solid is an adjective and dissolve(s) is a noun.

  • "The company has added its own cafés, called Café W, to many of its stores" - wants to->too, presumably because it's looking at "to(o) many" and ignoring the whole rest of the sentence

And some more examples where it only considers an adjacent word or two and not the wider context:

  • "it would be wrong for an ice cream parlour to use normal averages to forecast its sales, because these change over the course of a year." -> wants "because of"

  • "This campaign seems designed to respond to the challenges all booksellers are facing with new competition from Amazon - wants to remove "with"

  • "the reaction will proceed to the right and reach equilibrium by producing more nitrogen(IV) oxide." - wants article before more

  • "All three could result in the experimental value being different to the theoretical value." - wants being->is

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The Breakdown - B A Paris
Like Behind Closed Doors by the same author, this also has a title with more than one meaning, and was also very gripping and kept me up too late.
Cass, the protagonist, is driving home alone in a storm, late at night, on a country road. She passes a stationary car with a woman in it, and wonders if the woman needs help, but the woman in the car looks at her without trying to wave or signal to her, so Cass decides she's OK and hurries home. Next day, she learns that the woman has been murdered, and Cass might have been the last person to see her alive.
This is more of a typical mystery than Behind Closed Doors - in that, there wasn't much mystery apart from "will she escape, and how?" whereas in this, you don't know who killed the woman in the lane, or the reason behind the weird things Cass experiences over the next few months.

Find Me - J S Monroe
This was a very good twisty psychological thriller about a young man whose university girlfriend apparently committed suicide five years ago, but he keeps thinking he sees her in crowds, and her body was lost at sea and never found.
It's a bit like Trust in Me, in that both are about someone who doesn't believe their loved one committed suicide; except that in this one Rosa may be still alive ind in danger.
The scope of this one is wider than in many of the domestic-type psych thrillers I read, and it shades into a political thriller in places.
It's quite dark (especially if you like animals).
One very minor thing that I found distracting is that the protagonist is called Jar and it made it harder to take him seriously because I kept thinking of Jar-Jar.
Jar and Rosa were students at Cambridge, and I liked the way the book evoked the Cambridge university experience so well, both the heady excitement and the pressure.
I strongly recommend this book, if you can handle the animal cruelty.

The Versions of Us - Laura Fowler
This is a lit-fic what-if kind of book. It reminded me very much of Life after Life by Kate Atkinson. Both had the potential to be very interesting but failed in my opinion.
This book tells three parallel stories about Eva and Jim - one where they meet and get together and marry, one where they never meet and she marries her previous boyfriend David, and one where they meet and fall in love, but she finds she's pregnant with David's baby, so she breaks up with Jim and marries David. (She presents this to Jim as a fait accompli and doesn't give him the option. If he'd had the choice he would have married her and brought up the baby as his own. Eva's decision here is particularly odd because her own father is not her biological father and chose to marry her mother when she was pregnant by someone else, and Eva does know this, but she doesn't explicitly make the comparison, or seem aware that her actions are an implicit rejection of her father's choice.)
The blurb compares it to Sliding Doors, which is a film I love and find really narratively satisfying - everything follows logically from the one discrepancy of whether she caught or missed the train, and the effects of that small event cascade butterfly-wing-style into two very different versions of her life.
This book annoyed me early on because whether or not Eva and Jim's chance meeting happened was not the only discrepancy, so it lost a lot of the narrative elegance. Jim was carrying a different book at the chance meeting in versions 1 and 3 (but this didn't seem to be very significant), and the state of things between each of them and their previous lovers was different across versions.
I confess I only got about a third of the way through because I got bored and gave up. All three versions blurred into one. In all three Eva had one daughter and was married to a man she felt very distant from. All three had the same mood of vague discontent. In the same way as a good author should distinguish the voices of characters, so that you can usually tell who's speaking even without dialogue tags, I think this book should have distinguished the "voices" of the three stories better. I kept forgetting which one I was reading and had to refer back to the beginning of the chapter. That could have been done really well (and still been literary - this isn't me wishing this book were a different genre). The turns of phrase in each version could have been carefully chosen to evoke happiness, sadness, bittersweetness, or whatever, even when the events being described in each were the same. (Maybe I should write that book.)

Higher Institute of Villainous Education (H.I.V.E) - Mark Walden
This is a fairly fun YA fantasy-school-story. Hogwarts influences are obvious, including a female teacher who's a cat, and teachers with meaningful or punny names, and an inept boy with a dorky name beginning with N and an impressive heritage to live up to whose only talent is cultivating plants.
The kids, who are recruited because they show signs of villainy, don't really seem that villainous, just cunning. (Especially if you ignore their backstories and focus only on the events at HIVE.) I realise it's a difficult line to walk with sympathetic villain protagonists, but these could have done with more villainy. Artemis Fowl got the balance better.

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Last year Alex and I went to Malta for a few days for our tenth wedding anniversary, and yesterday I booked a Eurocamp holiday for the four of us for this August.

Before that, I hadn't booked a "proper" paid holiday since before Bethany was born (we're fortunate to have both sets of parents living near the seaside and willing to have us to stay, so we've been doing that in the meantime). And I was surprised and disappointed by how little progress there has been in holiday booking websites in that time, given how far other similar technologies have progressed.

Pretty much every holiday booking website (package deals, accommodation, or flights) starts by asking you when and where you want to go. (If you're lucky it'll allow you to say that you're flexible with the date by a few days.) But that isn't my use case. I care about what and how much. Timing is "summer" or "school holidays", and location is "uh, France maybe?" or "within about 3 hours' flight". I would like, instead, to enter some must-haves, should-haves and nice-to-haves, and getting back a list of the cheapest holidays that satisfy those criteria, regardless of when and where they are.

The worst example is when you're querying a website, and you put in some random dates and locations just to get some results back, and it says "Sorry, there were no results matching your search criteria." So you try some different random parameters, and get the same result. They're not "my search criteria"! They're some random search criteria you forced me to pick. How about you tell me what you do have available, rather than me asking "Do you have this? No? How about this? Or this?" (If I wanted to do that I'd play Penultima. But even then you can ask categories of question.) It might even be that their holidays run from Tuesday to Tuesday, but you don't know that, so you're trying various dates that are Fridays or Sundays and getting no results.

Going back to the specific example I just booked: We wanted a holiday camp, Eurocamp or similar, and we wanted to fly, because Zoe never has and she's looking forward to it. Ideally we wanted it near a sandy beach; and we had a slight preference for France because it's our strongest foreign language and the girls know a handful of words. Beyond that: shrug. There are dozens, maybe hundreds, of similar camps, even if you just restrict it to Eurocamp ones. They are all different prices on different days and weeks in a very unpredictable pattern. They are also different distances from different airports, flights to which also vary wildly and unpredictably in cost. What I was trying to do manually, and what I would like a website to do for me, is find a handful of such holidays with the cheapest total overall prices, and output them in a table along with things like whether they're near a sandy beach.

It's a big optimisation problem over a big search space, but it seems very similar to the one Google Maps solves when it gives you a variety of driving route options, or a variety of bus + train + walking options.

I spent several evenings working on solving it, and I really don't think I got anywhere near an optimal result. I managed to book a chalet in a holiday park for £540 for the week, which seems to be one of the best deals you can get inside the school holidays (most of them are over £1000); but then the flights ended up totalling more than the accommodation. The campsite is in Perpignan, and the flights there on the relevant day are £20pp, but the flights back are £140pp (Ryanair, go figure). I thought I found a good option in flying to and from Carcassonne, an hour away, where the flights were about £20pp each way; but I didn't finish the booking process one evening and they literally changed the price of the return flights overnight to £86pp. Even with the campsite held constant, we were still looking into loads of options: flights into Perpignan, Carcassonne, Toulouse, Béziers, Montpellier? Flights back from same, or another of the set if that's cheaper overall? If not flying to and from Perpignan, hire a car all week, or hire for the arrival day and again for the departure day (noting that extras like child seats are priced per hire), or get a train (multiplied by 4 passengers), or a taxi?

I just feel like this should be a solved problem by now.

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(which is freelance proofreading, mainly of textbooks)

* It's so nice to be doing something regularly that I feel competent at, and like I'm making a positive difference.

* It's nice to be able to do something useful and productive that can be done sitting down. This was a much bigger deal when I was still suffering from unexplained fatigue and often unable to do household chores. But it's still a nice thing now because I'm still unfit and a bit lazy.

* Money is good. We've been managing with one income for nearly seven years. Even though I'm now earning a fraction of what Alex earns, it's still surprising what a difference it makes when added to the disposable income rather than to the total.

* Complete flexibility for fitting around parenting (including one-off school visits etc) and housework, and even fitting in little bits while the kids are occupied watching a film.

* A more respectable-sounding reason for using childcare than just being tired and needing a break.

* The ego boost when I spot errors in the science (as opposed to language errors) that the authors and subject-expert QAs missed.

[edited to add]
* The content I'm reading is interesting and often educational - even in the subjects I did study at A-level, there's stuff I've forgotten, stuff that wasn't in my syllabus, and stuff that's genuinely new in the last 15 years, which is fun to learn about.

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We eventually got to see the new live-action Beauty and the Beast last night! It was fantastic. I loved the original cartoon very much, but this was even better.

Much more depth was given to the secondary characters. Lumière and Plumette have a serious romance that's been sadly interrupted, rather than just him being a lech and her being a coquette. There is more at stake for the staff (if the terms of the curse are not met, they will turn into inanimate furniture), and their characters and situations are developed more, so you care about their fates as well as the main characters. And, oh, LeFou. He is so torn between his conscience and his loyalty to the man he admires so much, and gets to make hard, character-defining decisions at a couple of points.

They made Maurice dignified! In the cartoon he's a comic buffoon making a crazy invention, but here he's an intelligent and only mildly eccentric artist making a beautiful moving sculpture that commemorates his beloved dead wife. I really liked him. He reminded me a bit of Alex and Alex's dad.

The Beast, rather than being just generically bad-tempered, perfectly captures a specific sort of jaded upper-class unhappiness. He could almost be in an Oscar Wilde play. I love that his character development from a roaring and physically threatening monster to a good guy goes via snarkily criticising Belle's taste in literature.

The Beast was beastly for longer than in the cartoon: it was Lumière and the staff, not him, who moved Belle from the tower prison cell to a bedroom, and he was angry with them for it; and it was their idea to invite her to dinner. Conversely, Gaston was less nasty in the early part of the film. He was still a huge narcissist, but he didn't snatch Belle's book and throw it in the mud, and he didn't lead the crowd in mocking Maurice's story of the Beast; he reproved the mockers, and tried to help Maurice look for the castle (presumably to ingratiate himself with the father of the girl he fancied). But when they couldn't find the castle, he got impatient and showed his true colours.

They gave the Beast a brief sympathetic backstory, and slightly played up the similarity between him and Belle having both lost their mothers young.

They added racial diversity. In the cartoon everyone's white, and I didn't really notice and took it for granted. But presumably there were black people in France around that time (like Alexandre Dumas), although I've no idea how many or what their social status was like. In this film, there are several black extras at the prince's party pre-curse, and Plumette and the opera-singing wardrobe are black (and both have larger roles than in the cartoon), and so is Père Robert, the villager Belle borrows books from. He has been changed from a librarian to a priest who lends Belle books from his personal collection, which makes a lot of sense, because the villagers are too few and too illiterate to have a village library. His role has also been expanded a bit: he tries to stop the mob from throwing Maurice into the asylum.

The one criticism I would make of the adaptation is that the terms of Belle's imprisonment are not very clear. In the cartoon, she buys her father's freedom by promising the Beast that she'll remain his prisoner. In the new film she makes no such promise to the Beast, but instead promises Maurice that she'll escape. We then see her making a sheet rope to try and get out of the window, but we don't see what comes of that (was it too short and she gave up?) Then she has dinner (fair enough, she's hungry), and then she goes exploring the west wing (why? is her curiosity really greater than her desire to escape and fulfil her promise to Maurice?), the Beast catches her and shouts at her, and she runs off out of the front door. So the door wasn't locked, she wasn't physically trapped, and she could have left by the door any time before or after dinner. Then, after the wolf fight, she repeats her line from the cartoon: "If you hadn't frightened me, I wouldn't have run away", which is nonsense here (see: promise to Maurice; sheet rope).

But despite that one small niggle, a truly excellent and beautiful film. Highly recommended.

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Yay, I made a gluten-free banana cake which was really nice. Alex couldn't tell the difference from a normal one.
I used half ground almonds, and half GF flour improved with xanthan gum.

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  • "in very close proximity" - it wants to blindly follow a rule changing "close proximity" to "proximity", which in this case would result in "in very proximity".

  • "as discussed earlier in Addition polymers." - it wants to blindly follow a rule changing "in addition" to "also".

  • "Which efficiency ratio would improve if a business did X?" - highlights "efficiency ratio would" as "incorrect word order", and suggests reordering to "would efficiency ratio".

  • "Surveys, focus groups and interviews are all primary research methods" - warns about comma between subject and verb, presumably parsing "surveys focus groups" like "lenses focus light-rays".

  • It wants to change "less than 12 months" to "fewer than 12 months", presumably because it's spotted the numeral in "less than 12" and not read any further. ("Less than 12 months" means a block of time shorter than 12 months, which could be 11.5 months or 1 week; it doesn't mean a whole number of months which is fewer than 12.) But, to be fair, this is one where a lot of humans would jump to the same conclusion, so it's not in the category of most of the absurd Grammarly fails I blog about.

  • Centralisation and decentralisation: wants centralisation with a Z (and will complain about it with an S), but decentralisation with an S (and will complain about it with a Z). Also wants centralised with an S, for bonus inconsistency. There are lots of examples like that, where it wants one form of the same -ise root word with an S and another with a Z.

  • "Although English is accepted as the language of many multinational companies, most people in countries like Japan and China are not fluent in English and this can cause misunderstandings." - wants comma after "although English". Very meta.

  • "Water treatment plants screen for and remove substances that cause immediate harmful effects to humans" - it wants to insert "to" after "plants", and change "remove" to "removes". I appreciate this sentence is hard to parse, with "plants" and "screen" both able to be either nouns or verbs; but I can't understand what it's aiming for with "Water treatment plants to screen for and removes substances that cause immediate harmful effects to humans", which just makes no sense.

  • It's quite good at noticing when a pair of adjacent words could be joined to make a new word (and therefore the space between them could be an error), but it's terrible at figuring out whether the separate or combined word would fit better in the context. For example, it keeps wanting to change "a steroid" to "asteroid".

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